What's new :

Index | Français | Contact us  


rss Facebook

inaturaliist.org

FSC

navigateur FCI

Lake Duparquet Research Station

LAKE DUPARQUET RESEARCH AND TEACHING FOREST RESEARCH STATION IS AN ACADEMIC INFRASTRUCTURE WHICH FIRST MISSION IS TO FACILITATE ACQUISITION OF KNOWLEDGE IN BOREAL FOREST SCIENCE AND RELATED SCIENTIFIC FIELDS.

An investment of 2 M$ from provincial department of Economic Development, Innovation and Export Trade (former department of Research, Science and Technology) allowed for Phase I construction. Additional contributions of 125 K$ each from Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) and from the Ministère de l’Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport (MESL) were directly directed to construction costs. Industrial partners also contributed by providing material, instrumentation and plans: Norbord OSB, Tembec, Domtar, Matériaux Blanchet, Landrienne Sawmill, Honeywell, Abitibi-Consolidated, Trame and Selbaie Mines.

Lake Duparquet Research Station has been built to:

  1. Support researchers and students working in boreal forest science at the Lake Duparquet Research and Teaching Forest and elsewhere in the region in their field and laboratory work;
  2. Ensure functionality and conviviality of work places as well as an access to leading edge laboratory equipment for researchers and students;
  3. Provide with an infrastructure for educational purposes, especially in forest sciences at academic and other levels, if necessary;
  4. Provide with a welcoming place for regional meetings as well as for national and international scientific forums.

LAKE DUPARQUET RESEARCH AND TEACHING FOREST RESEARCH STATION, FOLLOWING THE EXAMPLE OF THE UNIVERSITÉ DU QUÉBEC NETWORK, PARTICULARLY UQAT AND UQAM, IS OPEN TO ITS SURROUNDING MILIEU AND IS A WELCOMING PLACE FOR REGIONAL MEETINGS AS WELL AS FOR NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC FORUMS.

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

PHASE I

Projects of building a research station at the LDRTF started at the end of the 1990s. At that time, an increasing number of students was presenting some work place and lodging challenges. With a significant financial help from Economic Development, Innovation and Export Trade provincial department, Ministère de l’Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport (MELS) and Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), Phase I was completed in 2005. Another grant from CFI and from Research, Science and Technology provincial department allowed for the purchase of scientific equipment (for field and laboratory) and station’s furniture. Tembec, Norbord, Domtar, Matériaux Blanchet, Landrienne Sawmill, Honeywell, Abitibi-Consolidated, Trame and Selbaie Mines gave the bulk of construction material and research station equipment.

PHASE I INAUGURATION

On September 9, 2006, 110 persons attended the inauguration of Phase I of the Research Station, which is composed of four housing blocks. Mr. Pierre Corbeil, Québec’s Minister of Natural Resources and Wildlife, Mr. Daniel Rancourt, prefect of the MRC Abitibi-Ouest, Ms. Johanne Jean, UQAT rector, Mr. Roch Denis, UQAM rector, Mr. Roger Gauthier, president of the administration board of UQAT, and Mr. Brian Harvey, director of the LDRTF, have together cut the red ribbon.

LDRTF Inauguration

 

WOOD: A UNIQUE CONSTRUCTION AND ASPECT MATERIAL

Lodging blockWe insisted that wood be used for construction and finishing of the Research Station. Almost all woody material used for the construction of the station came from the region, and part of it even came from the LDRTF. A variety of wood types was used for floor, walls and ceiling covering. Floor in the multiuse pavilion is particularly astonishing. It was made of drown wood fished out of Lake Des Quinze, which gives it pale and dark shades. Finishing material used outdoor also came from the bottom of that lake.

PHASE II

Inaugurated September 20, 2010, the phase II includes an addition built onto the dendroecology laboratory and a new housing lodge. Providing homey accommodation for 10, the « Pavillon Desjardins Abitibi-Ouest » has been so-named in recognition of the generous gift provided by the Caisses Desjardins of the sector. The new space in the dendro lab will add work stations and equipment for wood density and isotopic analyses used primarily for dendroclimatological studies. The new infrastructures are also funded by the Government of Québec and the Canada Foundation for Innovation.

housing lodge
Desjardins Abitibi-Ouest lodge

Caisse Populaire AO

 

INFRASTRUCTURES

wifiWith the Research Station, students and researchers can carry on their research works while leaving on the LDRTF area. Access to desktop and Internet connexions is possible in all pavilions by cable and/or WIFI. For now, the Station is composed of four blocks:

Building A (community block)

This block presents a multiuse room (40-70 people’s capacity) with a fireplace, a classroom (25 people’s capacity), a well-equipped kitchen and a huge patio with an impressive view on Lake Hébécourt. Please consult evacuation plan of building A in case of emergency ground-floor 1 adobe, ground-floor 2 adobe, basementadobe.

Building B (lodging block)

This block incorporates 11 bedrooms (double and triple occupation), one of them being adapted for handicapped people and for families, one living room, one laundry room, one drying room and washrooms. All rooms are equipped with a desktop connexion and an Internet access. We can now welcome up to 35-40 people with the addition of phase II. Please consult evacuation plan of building B in case of emergency ground-floor 1 adobe, ground-floor 2 adobe.

Building C (DendroEcology laboratory)

LaboDendroThe Dendroecology laboratory includes spaces and equipments necessary for the preparation and analysis of wood samples. It includes:

  • a sanding room
  • a image analysis system, with a microscope, a digital camera, a high resolution scanner and many specialized softwares (WinCELL, WinDENDRO, WinFOLIA, WinRHIZO, WinSEEDLE, WinSTEM and FHX Fire History Analysis software)
  • 3 Velmex systems
  • a rotary Microton, for automatic tissue sectioning.

Also, an air-conditioned storehouse allows for long term conservation of samples. Samples of most of the dendroecology studies conducted in the region since de 1980s are stored in that room. Finally, this pavilion incorporates work stations for students and trainees. For more information, please contact Igor Drobyshev (igor.drobyshev@uqat.ca ) or visit the laboratory website at http://dendro.uqat.ca/. Please consult evacuation plan of building C adobe in case of emergency.

Paleoecology laboratory

In 2010, an extension of the laboratory of dendroecology allowed the addition of two rooms dedicated to paleoecology. Microscope, binocular loupes, sieve, refrigerator and freezer find their place. Many sediment collection probes are also available (kajak, Russian, Livingstone).

GDRIIn both cases, these laboratories contribute to the participation of UQAT and UQAM in the Cold Forest Research Group GDRI

Building D (multiuse laboratory)

The Multiuse laboratory is composed of two laboratories for field samples primary treatment. It is equipped with crushers for wood, vegetation or soil samples, scales, binoculars, air ovens, refrigerators, freezers (- 80°C), incubators, osmosis water treatment system, sinks and enough work surface. A meeting room and workspaces are also located in this pavilion. Please consult evacuation plan of building D adobe in case of emergency.

Multiuse block laboratory laboratory
laboratory laboratory (dryer) laboratory

 

Pavillon E (Desjardins Abitibi-Ouest)

Please consult evacuation plan of building E adobe in case of emergency.

LODGING

The Lake Duparquet Research Station offers, during some periods of the year, the possibility of renting a room including 3 meals, at modest price. It is also possible to rent a room for a meeting, a course, or any social happening. For more information or to make a reservation, please contact Raynald Julien (Raynald.Julien@uqat.ca), office number (819) 762-0971 ext. 2055, mobile phone (819) 763-9103. Please consult the pricing grid.

HOW TO GET THERE

If you come from (see map 1; map 2):

  • Kirkland Lake (Ontario): route 66 becomes route 117 in Québec. Follow route 117 south to Rouyn-Noranda, and take the turn off for route 101 North towards La Sarre in the outskirts of Rouyn. At the junction with route 393 follow the signs for Duparquet (turn to the left). In Duparquet, at the stop sign turn right and then at the junction with route 388 turn left towards Matheson (Ontario). Turn left at the sign on the highway that announces the research station.
  • Toronto, North Bay, New Liskeard (Ontario) : From Ont. Highway 11, take the last exit for New Liskeard towards route 65 east towards the province of Québec. Continue on Highway 65 until Notre-Dame du Nord in Québec. At the T-junction take a left onto route 101, north towards Rouyn-Noranda. Continue north, route 101 will join route 117. Watch for the turn off towards La Sarre where route 101 separates in the outskirts of Rouyn. Head towards LaSarre on route 101. At the junction with route 393 follow the signs for Duparquet (turn to the left). In Duparquet, at the stop sign turn right and then at the junction with route 388 turn left towards Matheson (Ontario). Turn left at the sign on the highway that announces the research station.
  • Timmins (Ontario): route 101 (Ontario) becomes route 388 in Québec. Turn right at the sign on the highway that indicates the research station.
  • Montréal (Québec): Take highway 15 north towards Mont-Laurier. It becomes highway 117 North. Follow signs to Rouyn-Noranda. In the city of Rouyn, the 117 will become Avenue Larivière. Follow signs towards route 101 north towards La Sarre. From route 101, turn left on route 393 towards Duparquet. At the stop sign turn right and then at the junction with route 388 turn left towards Matheson (Ontario). Turn left at the sign on the highway that announces the research station.

Address of the research station: 488 chemin Balbuzard, Rapide-Danseur, J0Z 3G0.


Open in new window

 

Grand-Pic